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Rabies vaccine — in the form of a sweet-smelling oral bait that is attractive to raccoons and skunks — will be dropped in rural areas of Vermont from low-flying aircraft and placed by hand in residential centers in the coming week.

A vital tract of forestland was protected last month in the Shutesville Hill Wildlife Corridor, which lies between the Green Mountains and Worcester Range and is one of the most important wildlife regions in Vermont.

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South Burlington Firefighters found a mother in distress when they responded to a call on Tilley Drive at around 5 p.m. on July 15.

Large fishing spiders walking on water can be fascinating – or terrifyingly unnerving. The latter reaction is common among St. Michael’s College students as we sample Vermont’s streams and ponds.

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Medora Plimpton would love to work herself out of a job. In spite of the emotional rollercoaster, presumably in the “other duties as assigned” on her job description, Plimpton loves being a wildlife rehabilitator.

Each fall, thousands of broad-winged hawks soar across the New England sky in flocks known as kettles on their way to South and Central America. The sky swirls with hawks bubbling up on thermals of hot air and then streaming southward. It is enough to take your breath away – all those raptor…

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The town of Elmore and the Elmore Lake Association have been awarded a $19,297 grant from the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation’s Watershed Management Division.

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I grew up on a street lined with tall, stately elms. While walking to school one day, I found a bird’s nest that the wind had blown down. The nest was a beautiful, silky gray pouch. My teacher helped me identify it as a Baltimore oriole’s nest.

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Is there ever just “caws” for murdering crows?

Sparked by a Front Porch Forum post, that was a local debate.

Entitled “Murder of Crows,” the post, attributed to Caitlin Waddick, of Shelburne, asks for suggestions to get rid of crows.

Many of us avoid close encounters of the eight-legged kind. But if you’ve ever come eye-to-eye with a spider, you’ve probably noticed they have several more eyes than we do. Most have four pairs.

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I’ve been waiting to catch a glimpse of Condylura cristata, the star-nosed mole, ever since I learned about this animal during a small mammals course in graduate school. Can you imagine a palm-sized mole whose pink, star-shaped nose contains 22 fleshy tentacle-like appendages, living right here underfoot in New England?

Once, when I was little, I was so thrilled to come across a gorgeous, dark red trillium that I picked it and placed it in a vase in the house. I was disappointed when it quickly wilted. And it smelled bad.

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Opening day was May 10 at the Waterbury Stowe Fish and Game Club, 5365 Waterbury Stowe Road, Waterbury.

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