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In late fall, around the solstice and harvest moon, Abenaki families would gather together to collect and inventory their bounty of dried corn, beans, tobacco and squash that they had nurtured, cared for and protected all summer.

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My family is cast to the wind. Kids in college and not coming home for Thanksgiving; Jackie with her mother and won’t be back in time for turkey day. I texted a friend the other day saying I feel a bit like a lighthouse keeper. Just me, the dog and the chickens. Gives me time to check in on …

In all the chaos of the election, it would be easy to lose track of the fact that Nov. 8 was National First-Generation Student Day. This day was meant to highlight and celebrate those who are the first in their family to attend college. I am proud to be one of those Vermonters.

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Takeaways from … umm … an election? A coup d’état? A pathetic money grab? An I-told-you-so second-round pandemic on steroids? As of last Friday, the election produced the ultimate loser, the coup and money grabs on hold, and the dreadful pandemic still with us and growing.

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In the poem, “The Death of the Hired Man” by Robert Frost, a farmer’s wife talks to her husband about a homeless man who has worked for them in the past and suddenly reappears at their home. She says, “Home is the place where, when you have to go there, they have to take you in.”

In a guest perspective by Planned Parenthood’s Lucy Leriche, she uses one specious claim after another to create the impression that the citizens of Vermont must urgently ratify Prop 5. (“Personal freedoms at risk with Barrett,” News & Citizen, Nov. 5, 2020)

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Outdoor brands are following up not only with surveys on how their product performs, or how you feel about their website’s catalog portal, but with reminders to include them on your next excursion. “Our social media team would be stoked to get some images from your recent outdoor adventures!…

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State and local health officials are asking — even imploring — people to limit out-of-state travel during the upcoming holidays. They’re also reminding us to avoid large gatherings, strongly advising us to limit all social gatherings to 10 people or under.

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At the start of the Selectboard’s Nov. 23 meeting there will be a virtual ribbon cutting to recognize the completion of the removal of overhead utilities and poles on Main Street, the culmination of two years of major construction in our downtown. The meeting starts at 5:30 p.m. and can be a…

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Helen Day Art Center is embarking on several new initiatives, including the development of a new strategic plan, a “Seizing the Future” campaign for expanded education and accessible exhibition experiences, and changing the name of the art center to better reflect the values of the organization.

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Democracy is messy, but in the way that gardening is messy; the mess is part of creating something beautiful and healthful — as long as something beautiful and healthful is what you plant and tend and what takes root. If the past five years have shown us anything, it is that there are ugly, …

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The exhausting national election is now over, other than counting misplaced ballots and resolving lawsuits. Now is a good time for Vermonters to let partisan animosities subside, and take a serious look at what the governor and the next Legislature are likely to face. Here’s a concise list.

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I can remember thinking, some 70 years ago, how good it was to be born into an American family. Odd as that may seem, this early childhood tie to country reflected a spirit of unity and trust we had as a nation. In a way, America was part of our extended family.

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In an unprecedented year, perhaps it’s only natural that we have an unprecedented election — the first in our lifetimes to occur during a global pandemic, and one in which an astounding number of votes will be cast after being mailed to voters. While many of us are used to staying up late to…

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