Notable Sculptors

Nan Carle Beauregard’s photographs chronicle “Notable Sculptors of Barre Gray Granite” at granite museum show through the month.

When you are out and about during Vermont’s season of the color, be sure to go see Morristown photographer Nan Carle Beauregard’s exhibit, “Notable Sculptors of Barre Gray Granite,” at the Vermont Granite Museum through Oct. 30.

This exhibit starts with a nod to the history of the granite industry in Vermont. The extension of the railroad from Montpelier to Barre in 1875 opened the marketplace for Civil War monuments and building materials made of durable Barre gray granite.

Not long after, in 1883, the Chicago World’s Fair included a stall for Barre gray and its reputation bolted into international fame. Highly trained and educated sculptors were recruited from Italy and Scotland and the Golden Age of Barre Gray Granite came alive.

The artists’ skills, their passion and their pain set the stage for modern day sculptors. Beauregard's photographs of the Quarry at Millstone Hill and the monuments carved for Elia Corti and the Bursa family at Hope Cemetery are meant to show the standards set for all the generations of sculptors to follow.

The exhibit also showcases the work of sculptors who are both keeping the tradition alive and moving the work forward in innovative ways. Those sculptors include Giuliano Cecchinelli, Garry Sassi, George Kurjan-owicz, Heather Milne Ritchie, Ryan Mays, and Chris Miller.

Beauregard exclusively used her iPhone 11 Pro as the camera for this exhibit. A longtime Canon photographer, she wanted the ability to take spontaneous photographs in a non-threatening manner.

She is on the board of River Arts in Morrisville.

More information at vtgranitemuseum.org or nancarle@me.com.

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