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The Diener family has been the face of Fond du Lac basketball since the 1960s, when Dick was an all-state player. As a coach, Dick won a state title at Colfax in 1978 and twice coached Fond du Lac to the state final. Younger brother Tom, who played at UWGB, coached Milwaukee Vincent to five state titles and took Milwaukee Hamilton and Cedarburg to state as well, coaching five future NBA players. Travis (above), a nephew to Dick and Tom, was an all-state guard at Fond du Lac, was the point guard on Marquette's 2003 Final Four team, averaged 14.1 in four seasons with the Golden Eagles and played five years in the NBA. Meanwhile, Dick's sons Derek (Army), Drew (St. Louis) and Drake (DePaul) all played Division I. Travis' sister Rachel also played at St. Louis. Drew coached Cardinal Stritch to the NAIA Division 2 title in 2013. John, Tom's son, is playing at San Diego after scoring 2,250 points at Cedarburg. Another cousin, Dallas, won the WIAA state golf title in 2000.

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The only problem with Eric's unprecedented sweep of the five men's speed skating events in the 1980 Olympics (above) was that the final race was overshadowed by Team USA's upset of the Soviet Union in men's hockey the night before. Winning every race from 500 meters to 10,000 meters remains the greatest individual performance in winter Olympic history and, along with three World All-Round and four World Sprint titles, made Heiden an international superstar. His younger sister Beth, slowed by an ankle injury, managed only a bronze medal in speed skating in the same Olympics. However, Beth was a tremendous all-around athlete who won the World All-Round Championship in speed skating in 1979, the World Cycling Championship in 1980 and, as a student at Vermont, the individual title in the NCAA cross country ski meet in 1983. Eric also went into bicycle racing, competing in the Tour de France in 1986.

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Pat (above) won a WIAA state basketball title at Madison East in 1959, earned nine letters — three each in football, basketball and baseball — at UW and played eight years in the NFL, but is best known as an all-American end on what still is the most famous Badgers game ever, the 42-37 loss to USC in the 1963 Rose Bowl in which UW rallied from a 42-14 fourth-quarter deficit to give itself a chance to win. Richter caught 11 passes for 163 yards in that game, but made his greatest contribution to the state when he returned to UW as athletic director in 1989. His first major hire was football coach Barry Alvarez and the rest, as they say, is history. Pat's son Barry was a four-year starter on defense for the UW men's hockey team, playing on an NCAA champion in 1990 and earning all-American honors in 1993. Barry also played in the 1994 Olympics and spent five seasons in the NHL.